Healthcare

Reasons for suffering from a twitching nose

Nose twitches are involuntary muscle contractions which are usually harmless. You could probably get a nose twitch if stressed out, tired or dehydrated. Even being excited can cause these spasms as people with continuous nose twitches have been found to be under the influence of extreme emotions.

Being said they are harmless, they may be distracting and frustrating as these contractions can last a few seconds or a few hours. But sometimes they could be a symptom of nerve damage or a result of a tic disorder known as Tourette’s syndrome.

Underlying causes of nose twitches

Being deficient in Vitamins and Minerals

Vitamins and Minerals are an essential part of our nutrition and play a vital role in the body’s accumulative well being. They are responsible for proper blood circulation, nerve function and muscle tone in the body. A lack of potassium in the body has been linked to giving rise to nose twitches.

If you are diagnosed with a vitamin deficiency, your doctor may have to get you started on dietary supplements to balance out the lack of vitamins and minerals you are not getting from your diet.

Medication

Some medications can cause nose twitches throughout your body and on the face.  These medicines may include diuretics, asthma medication, statin medication, medicines to control high blood pressure and hormone replacements.

Nose spasms caused by such medications are adverse reactions and should be consulted with your doctor for its treatment options being prescribed with an alternative.

Nerve damage

Nerve damage can lead to serious problems in the body as involves the nervous system. Nerve damage from diseases like Parkinson’s or injuries can cause muscle contractions in the nose.

If a doctor diagnoses you with a nerve disorder for a nose twitch complaint, treatment and medications may be prescribed to reduce the spasms and improve associated symptoms.

Facial tic disorder

Tic disorders are facial muscular spasms which cannot be controlled by the body. Although this order is prevalent in children, anybody can be affected by it. Other symptoms which people experience if diagnosed with tic disorder are blinking eyes, raising eyebrows, tongue clicking and clearing the throat.

These symptoms usually require no treatment and mostly resolve on their own. But if they persist and start frustrating you, your doctor may recommend certain treatments such as therapy, medication, botox injections, brain stimulation, and stress relief medications.

Tourette syndrome

This is a neurological disorder which causes involuntary movements and vocalized tics. Its symptoms can be detected early in childhood and include nose scrunching, head jerking, rapid eye movements, sniffing, swearing and repeating words or phrases.

Tourette syndrome does not usually require any medical intervention unless it affects the quality of life and gets distracting. Treatments for this disorder may be discussed with a professional.

In rare cases, nose spasms can be a symptom of life-threatening diseases such as brain tumor, stroke, traumatic brain injury and injury to the face, head or neck. Hence, if the twitches are consistent, medical help should be helped immediately and the symptoms should be evaluated.

Nose twitches become a habit for some people that only they themselves can notice. In order to get rid of continuous nose twitches, you should eliminate the causes leading to them.

You should ensure that you are getting a good night’s sleep, reduce the intake of caffeinated products and other stimulants, take a potassium-rich diet, avoid being stressed and under pressure.

But in cases where the twitches occur in high frequency for other people to start noticing and causing discomfort for its sufferer, medical help should be taken for relief.

Source

https://www.quora.com/Why-does-my-nose-keep-twitching

https://www.healthline.com/health/nose-twitching

 

 

Michelle M

Conducting research in a laboratory can often feel isolated so Lisa prefers writing about scientific research in healthcare. She contributes stories about the latest research in all fields related to health. Email: lisa@askhealthnews.com

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